top of page
  • Gina

Unicorn Sensory Play

In this BLOG post I will share ideas for unicorn-themed sensory play including materials, directions and clean-up tips.


Click HERE for all of our favorite unicorn-themed sensory tools and sensory containers.

A Play Filled Life participates in an affiliate program and may receive a tiny commission on eligible purchases through her link, at no extra cost to you.

Head to our Instagram to see all of these ideas in action!!


Sparkly Oobleck:

Materials:

  • (2) cups Cornstarch

  • (1) cup Water

  • Sensory bin or bowls

  • Spoon

  • Food coloring

  • Glitter (optional)


How-To:

  • Mix corn starch, water, and food coloring in a tub or tray and have fun experimenting!

  • Add in your favorite scoops or bowls and PLAY!!

  • Make observations as you play. How does it smell? How does it feel? What happens when you add more water to the Oobleck bin? What does it look like as it dries?

  • Explore color theory: what happens when you mix purple and pink together?

  • If you let Oobleck completely dry out and harden, you can store it in an airtight container. The next time you want to use it, simply add water to reactivate!


Messy play is SO beneficial for children. It's open-ended, encourages creativity, provides sensory input & teaches them about their personal boundaries. Messy play activates the senses and has been known to be calming, offering an incredible opportunity to practice self-regulation strategies.


Unicorn Moon Sand:

Materials:

  • 2 cups Flour

  • 1/4-1/2 cup Vegetable or coconut oil

  • Glitter (optional)

  • Sensory tray or bowl

  • Spoon


How-To:

  • Pour all of the ingredients into a sensory tray or bowl. Mix well.

  •  I like to go in with my hands to make sure that everything is really incorporated in. The consistency should be soft, but firm. You should be able to make a ball with the mixture, but also crumble it up.

  • Add in your favorite scoops or bowls and PLAY!!


If it is too crumbly, add a bit more oil. If it is too wet, add a bit more flour. IMPORTANT:

There is a difference between taste safe and edible. This recipe is not meant for consumption but it is safe if your child is still exploring with their mouth’s & tries it.


In order for this to be taste safe, you must bake the flour in a sheet pan at 350° for 10-15 minutes. This kills any bacteria that may be found on the flour.


Magical Potion Play:

Materials:

  • Metallic Paint

  • Water

  • Sensory tray or bowl

  • Spoon


How-To:

  • Pour a tablespoon or two of paint into your sensory tray, add water and mix well.

  • Add in your favorite scoops or bowls and PLAY!!


Add in the shine of the sun and this will be your new favorite activity of all time! You don't need to do all the colors. Pick one and use one bowl and it will be just as magical. Mix it and scoop it and dump it. Pour it into containers, transfer it to another bowl or just switch your hands around and watch it move.


The possibilities for learning and fun are ENDLESS.


Go check out Friends Art Lab, she introduced us to metallic paint and her page is wonderful!

Sparkly Pom Pom Water Play:

Materials:

  • Water

  • Craft Pom Pom

  • Sensory bin or bowl


How-To:

  • Pour your Pom Poms into your sensory bin, add water.

  • Add in your favorite scoops or bowls and PLAY!!


Ways to enhance your play:

  • Add in plastic letters or numbers and explore academic concepts such as letter names, letter sounds, beginning reading, number identification, counting, etc.

  • Add in measuring cups & spoons & incorporate math words such as volume & weight.

  • Add in plastic animals, gems, trucks or trinkets and incorporate them into your play.


Sensory Bin:

This started off as a unicorn sensory bin and then my daughter wanted to add mermaids and princesses and everything else sparkly and fun she could find!


Read our blog post HERE to learn all the ways you can dye pasta for your very own sensory bin!


You get to decide what is safe and manageable in your home. Always monitor young children in or around water. Small objects may be choking hazards.

Comments


bottom of page